Hardanger On-Point ITH Designs

Hardanger On-Point Jeans Project

With Hardanger On Point designs I added an extra finishing edge for more firmness and stitch security.

These designs are made for the long haul.

Hardanger On- Point designs can be sewn directly onto projects (not free-standing appliques). But still 5 of these designs can be sewn as Free-standing appliques. You can then attach them to what ever project you want – fabric, cards, lampshades, woodworking, . . . . The choice is yours. That’s why it’s DIY and ITH.

Document of Instructions

WOW I forgot how much work we put into this one.  Forty (40) beautiful pages including the purse pattern.

Heavy Plum Cardigan

It looks like I’ve gone Plum crazy making so many plum colored projects lately. I zig-zag stitched these two Free Standing hearts onto this long cotton cardigan and cut away the fabric from the back of the hearts. This is not a plain cardigan and it’s thick so hooping it was not an option. The additional of the two Hardanger free-standing hearts dresses it up a little. Which otherwise would not have been possible.

Hardanger on Jeans

I never thought I would put Hardanger on Jeans, but here you have it. It really dressed them up. Now I want to make more HD pieces to decorate the pockets. Using the free-standing designs beats removing the seams of jeans and hooping them. Plus no embroidering over THAT seam.

The Hardanger Essentials/Safety Bag

Pattern/Instructions Included

I created this purse for people who for safety reasons need to keep their cell phones, inhalers, medications, etc on their person at all times (i.e. folks in retirement facilities, elderly living alone at home, those of us who fall easily, etc).

I wanted this purse to be cross body so the weight of the phone would not be on the neck.  The purse would be on the hip more so than in front of you so it won’t be hanging in the sink when you are washing your hands. It will keep your safety items secure and easily accessible. It won’t be in the way when you go to the bathroom, get hung on anything when transferring from one surface to another, + many more reasons for its design. You may see more potential that will aid you or someone you know.

You’ll need a 5×7 hoop (125 x 175mm) to sew these design. However, the final dimensions of your finished projects are limited only by your imagination because, with my art it’s all about taking embroidery beyond the hoop.

Laura

Hardanger Machine Embroidery aka “Hardangish”

Hardangish is my term I coined for my Hardanger Machine Embroidery because, let’s face it, no machine can truly duplicate handmade Hardanger embroidery. But I try. As a consequence, I’ll sometimes use the terms interchangeably when talking about my machine embroidery interpretation of this fabric art style.

These designs require fabric and water soluble stabilizer.

Some of my Hardanger designs are free-standing designs (not free standing lace). Rather, they’re of ornaments, bookmarks, etc. which can also can be applied to items impossible to hoop. In some instances, they can even be sewn together into larger projects…that really make a statement.

Hardanger On-Point Collection
Bookmarks make nice gifts and fit into a card – Hardanger On-Point Collection

Hardanger and jeans are an unlikely combination. But I like embroidery on jeans. Regrettably,  they’re too much trouble to hoop. However, free-standing designs make embellishing those favored jeans sooo easy. Slide the pants leg over the cuff feature of your sewing machine and stitch down the pre-fabricated design.

After the designs attached, you may turn the item inside out and cut away the fabric from behind the designs for a peek-a-boo method. The open, lacy parts show up so nicely this way.

Hardanger On-Point Collection
Hardanger On-Point Collection

In some cases, designs can be sewn in blocks, and stitched together to make larger, bolder projects, such as table covers, bedspreads and jackets. Oh, my.

Hardanger Squared Collection
Hardanger Squared Collection

Hardanger Rainbows was my first attempt at adding color sequences to a traditionally monochromatic fabric art form, thereby giving it more contemporary look.

Hardanger Rainbows

Don’t miss out on showing off some Hardanger to your family and friends.

Hardanger Machine Embroidery

Hardangish

Hardanger Alphabet

Hardanger Angels - Bella

Hardanger Angels - Heather

Hardanger Angels - Mary Jane

 

Hardanger Dimensions

Hardanger Eggs

Hardanger Floral Angels

Hardanger Floral Hearts

Hardanger On-Point

 

Hardanger Ornaments

Hardanger Rainbows

Hardanger Squared

Hardanger Stockings

Hardanger Wreaths

 

In The Hoop

In-The-Hoop

Lacy Heart Frames

Molas! Series

Needlepoint Machine Embroidery Series

Pincushions/Mug Rugs

In-The-Hoop #2

Hardanger Angel Bella

Hardanger Angel Heather

Hardanger Dimensions

Hardanger Floral Angels

Hardanger Floral Hearts

Hardanger Floral Wreaths

Hardanger On Point

Hardanger Ornaments

Hardanger Squared

Hardanger Stockings

In-The-Hoop #3

Ten-Point Star

Floral Fountains


Glorious Hearts

Our Whole Life

Purple Feathers

Summer in My Heart

Welcome Quilt Banner

Welcome Fall Quilt Banner

Welcome Spring Quilt Banner

Winter Magic Quilt Banner

Trapunto Flowers

Cultural

Embroidery and fabric arts in general, like other artistic expressions, often have a cultural component unique to the people and places from which they originated. Regardless of origin, I’ve been fascinated and amazed with the richly different expressions of fabric, as well as how borrow from other forms. It’s why I’ve tried my hand at translating some of these techniques.

Over the years, I’ve hobbled together a unique collection of machine embroidery that I hope pay homage to a few cultural origins of inspirations. That collection includes a rather extensive series of Hardanger Machine Embroidery – or I use to call it, Hardangish.

Hardangish Squared Table Cover

Also favorites are Hmong and Mola inspired designs

Laura's Sewing Studio Hmong

Molas Nouveau Fish & Uh-Oh
Molas Nouveau Fish & Uh-Oh

But more recently a collection of  Mehndi art transformed to thread. These are by no means the sum total of artistic creativity and I have more art forms and ideas to explore than I suspect I have time left to finish. But isn’t that a good thing.

Lauras-Sewing-Studio-Mehndi-Body-Art

Hardanger Machine Embroidery

Hardangish

Hardanger Alphabet

Hardanger Angels - Bella

Hardanger Angels - Heather

Hardanger Angels - Mary Jane

Hardanger Dimensions

Hardanger Eggs

Hardanger Floral Angels

Hardanger Floral Hearts

Hardanger On-Point

Hardanger Ornaments

Hardanger Rainbows

Hardanger Squared

Hardanger Stockings

Hardanger Wreaths

Hmong

Hmong

Hmong's the Way

Mehndi

Mehndi Body Art

Molas!

Molas Nouveau

Mucho Molas Nouveau

Cutwork

The first time I put scissors to my fabric while stitching out one of my own cutwork designs left me with a little trepidation. However, I got over that really quick and became a seasoned pro at the whole cutwork thing. Of course, cutwork technique is used in more that just traditional cutwork designs and is integral to Hardanger Machine Embroidery, Reverse Applique and Outdoor Quilts. For those not content to simply put fabric to thread, exploring the world of cutwork designs is a must. Be bold!

Machine embroidery cutwork has been around for a long time. There are various forms of cutwork accomplished within the embroidery hoop.

These are but a few of mine:
• Eyelets – shown here in pink
• Traditional Cutwork (cutwork + lace)
• Prisms (cutwork + applique)
Hardanger – a concept I’ll cover in a page all it’s own

Cutwork Collection
Cutwork Eyelet Collection

Eyelets are simple and beautiful cutwork that creates a design with holes. It’s a very old fashion form of cutwork. I made this from a very old antique piece that I own.

Nancy’s Jacobean Cutwork
Nancy’s Jacobean Cutwork

Cutwork + Lace is what I call ‘traditional’ cutwork.

The process goes something like this:
• Hoop fabric with water soluble stabilizer on the bottom
• Sew an outline where the fabric is to be removed
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop
• Cut away the fabric inside the stitch lines but don’t cut the water soluble stabilizer
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Sew the lace inside the opening and the finishing stitches that cover the raw edges of the opening.
• Wash out the water soluble stabilizer.

Prisms Amour - Cutwork & Reverse Applique
Prisms Amour – Cutwork & Reverse Applique

Prisms (cutwork + applique)

This method goes something like this:
• Hoop fabric with water soluble stabilizer on the bottom
• Sew an outline where the fabric is to be removed
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop
• Cut away the fabric inside the stitch lines but don’t cut the water soluble stabilizer
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Place a layer of see through applique fabric over the area i.e. organza or organdy
• Sew the tack down stitches that attach the applique fabric to the main fabric
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop.
• Cut away the excess applique fabric from outside the stitches
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Sew any details on top of the applique fabric followed by the the finishing stitches that cover the raw edges of the applique and the opening at the same time.
• Wash out the water soluble stabilizer.

Hardanger – includes a cutwork concept I’ll cover in a page all it’s own.

Cutwork

Beginnings Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Cutwork

Diamonds Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Heart Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Nancy's Jacobean Cutwork

Prisms Amour

Hardanger Machine Embroidery

Hardangish

Hardanger Alphabet

Hardanger Angels - Bella

Hardanger Angels - Heather

Hardanger Angels - Mary Jane

Hardanger Dimensions

Hardanger Eggs

Hardanger Floral Angels

Hardanger Floral Hearts

Hardanger On-Point

Hardanger Ornaments

Hardanger Rainbows

Hardanger Squared

Hardanger Stockings

Hardanger Wreaths