Prisms Amour Applique

Add a touch of flair and a bit of dare to your next machine embroidery project, with Prisms Amour.

This embroidery collection is designed specifically for this new and innovative embroidery technique.

Photos shown include organza see through designs on garments and table cover.

It takes the guesswork out while leaving the fun in place. Your greatest concern with these embroidery designs is deciding onto what you won’t sew them. Victoria, look out!

Applique Collections

Applique is a novel concept that has been sewn in machine embroidery for a long time. I prefer it for large areas instead of flat solid fills. Plus the wide range of fabrics that can be used, esp the almost solid fabrics with their various shades and minor prints, adds a special touch to the design you can’t get with machine embroidery thread alone.

Some applique designs are quite ornate as the Applique Elegance Collection.

With some minor variations it follows something like this:
1. Sew the outline of the applique shape onto the background fabric
2. Lay the applique fabric over that area
3. Sew the tack down stitches that apply the fabric to the background fabric
4. Take the hoop off the machine – Don’t take the fabric out of the hoop
5. Trim the excess applique fabric from around the outside of the stitching
6. Return the hoop to the machine
7. Sew the details on top of the applique fabric
8. Sew the finishing stitches around the raw edges of the applique fabric – usually satin stitching.

Applique is the perfect choice for towels and other fabrics with a pile (ie. velour, velveteen, corduroy). The applique fabric prevents the pile from coming up through the machine embroidery stitching and creates a flat smooth surface for the design to be sewn.

Love My Bloomers
Love My Bloomers

Some applique designs are quite elegant as the floral design in the Spring Quilt Banner.

Spring Banner Quilt Project
Spring Banner Quilt Project

If you have not sewn applique before, don’t be afraid to try it in your embroidery hoop. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

Applique


Applique Elegance

Baby Animals Applique

Big Crazy Cats Applique

Chenille

Double Wedding Ring Applique

Fantasy Applique


Love My Bloomers

Mandala Applique

Pami – Flaunt Your Sass!

Pots O' Flowers Applique

Prisms Amour Applique

Rose of Sharon Applique

Simple Flowers Applique


Spring Banner

Tulips Applique

Tulips Filigree

Placement Method for Multiple Hoop Designs

My method for aligning multi-hoop designs works best with a light box or light box set up.

This is the method I use to create large designs like the ones you might create using one of embroidery design collections: Hardangish Rainbows, Cutwork, Pillowcases, Prisms Amour, Fantasy Applique, Monogram Potpourri and more.

 

 

For a ‘Master Template’, print a paper template of the entire design. If you have a computer program that will allow you to put the entire design together onscreen, do that. Then print it actual size. This master template is 6.5 x 11 inches.

My embroidery software program allows me to do this. When I print the whole design actual size, it prints on several sheets of paper. It creates registration marks on each page for aligning the individual pages. I tape them together trimming the excess margins as needed using a rotary cutter and mat.

Alternatively, print the “individual” designs. Cut them out and tape them together creating the whole design for a ‘Master Template’.

Fold the master template in quarters to create the x/y coordinates for the whole design. This is needed to align it with the fabric.

The x/y coordinates are shown here in black on the master template.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You will also need templates of the individual designs.

Print paper templates of each individual design and cut these out.

Be sure the x and y coordinates are drawn on each one.

Shown here this design is divided into 6 parts. Each part will be hooped into a 4×4 hoop and sewn to create the whole design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare you fabric as you normally would for embroidery.

Fold the fabric in quarters to create the x/y coordinates and mark with a washable marking pen (shown here in blue).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using a light box or light box set up, place the ‘Master Template’ on the glass with the light turned on.

Tape it onto the glass.

Place the fabric on top aligning the blue x/y coordinates on the fabric with the black x/y coordinates of the Master Template.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This photo shows 2 templates in place.

Using the individual paper templates, place the first one on top of the fabric.

You should be able to see the master template design through the fabric using the light box. Align the design of the individual template with the design on the master template.

Hint: For darker fabrics cut off the overhead light to see through the fabric. This is how I did the Fantasy Applique blocks, borders, and corners.

Tape or pin the template in place. Pin thru the fabric and individual template only.

Once the first template is in place, repeat this process for the second one. I usually put 2 templates on at a time before starting to sew.

 

 

 

 

Hoop the fabric/stabilizer as you normally would using the x/y coordinates on the individual paper template to align it with the 4×4 hoop and hoop template.

NOTE: The x/y lines on the master template and the fabric are only for placing those 2 together. It does not apply to the individual templates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I prefer to hoop only the stabilizer.

Using a ruler mark the x/y coordinates with a washable marking pen shown here in blue. I used the quarter marks on the hoop for alignment.

Spray the stabilizer with spray adhesive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the hoop on the light box.

Lay the fabric over the hoop aligning the x/y coordinates on the stabilizer with the x/y coordinates on the individual paper template.

Once aligned, press the fabric onto the spray adhesive. Pin around the edge of the hoop with straight pens. I prefer my pins be a little bent for this.

Be sure to pin close to the outside edge of the hoop so the machine will not hit any pins when sewing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bring up the design on you machine. Rotate, mirror, whatever needs to be done, before placing the hoop on the machine.

Once the hoop is on the machine align the needle at the center x/y intersection printed on the individual template.

Once you have done this, write down your machine settings (rotation, mirror, left/right/up/down, etc).

Remove the pins from the template.

Remove the template.

Sew the design.

Repeat the above process for the next design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This shows the second template hooped and aligned at the machine, ready to remove the paper template and sew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have sewn the first series of designs, return to the Master Template.

Place the fabric on top and realign the blue x/y coordinates of the fabric with the black x/y coordinates of the Master Template.

It is ready to repeat lining up the next 2 individual templates and sew some more.

Shown here the next 2 designs are aligned and ready to be hooped.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This shows all 6 templates sewn.

This method works well for me for any size design including very large designs like the Together quilt. This design is 19”x 32”. I hooped it 27 times.

I use this same method for embroidering multiple designs on garments as well. I hope this method works good for you too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished Pillow – 166×270 mm

 

 

Shown here sewn on an 18” pillow.

This pillow was made for my friend Cyndi
She was my Secret Pal 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Terms for Re-use and Redistribution

If you would like to share these instructions with your friends, please be fair and send them to this website to read it.

If you are a teacher or retailer and would like to use the information contained here in your classes please distribute the contents in its entirety giving full credit to Laura at Laura’s Sewing Studio.

Laura Waterfield

www.LaurasSewingStudio.com

Laura@LaurasSewingStudio.com

If you have any words of wisdom to add, please email me. I am always open to learning new ideas and better ways to sew.

If you want to use my tutorial in a group or part of a class instruction, please send your students to this website to print the directions themselves. If you must print it for them, then please print it in its entirety, including my copyright and web address. Thank you for your integrity!

Copyright © Laura Waterfield 2002-2018

Cutwork

The first time I put scissors to my fabric while stitching out one of my own cutwork designs left me with a little trepidation. However, I got over that really quick and became a seasoned pro at the whole cutwork thing. Of course, cutwork technique is used in more that just traditional cutwork designs and is integral to Hardanger Machine Embroidery, Reverse Applique and Outdoor Quilts. For those not content to simply put fabric to thread, exploring the world of cutwork designs is a must. Be bold!

Machine embroidery cutwork has been around for a long time. There are various forms of cutwork accomplished within the embroidery hoop.

These are but a few of mine:
• Eyelets – shown here in pink
• Traditional Cutwork (cutwork + lace)
• Prisms (cutwork + applique)
Hardanger – a concept I’ll cover in a page all it’s own

Cutwork Collection
Cutwork Eyelet Collection

Eyelets are simple and beautiful cutwork that creates a design with holes. It’s a very old fashion form of cutwork. I made this from a very old antique piece that I own.

Nancy’s Jacobean Cutwork
Nancy’s Jacobean Cutwork

Cutwork + Lace is what I call ‘traditional’ cutwork.

The process goes something like this:
• Hoop fabric with water soluble stabilizer on the bottom
• Sew an outline where the fabric is to be removed
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop
• Cut away the fabric inside the stitch lines but don’t cut the water soluble stabilizer
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Sew the lace inside the opening and the finishing stitches that cover the raw edges of the opening.
• Wash out the water soluble stabilizer.

Prisms Amour - Cutwork & Reverse Applique
Prisms Amour – Cutwork & Reverse Applique

Prisms (cutwork + applique)

This method goes something like this:
• Hoop fabric with water soluble stabilizer on the bottom
• Sew an outline where the fabric is to be removed
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop
• Cut away the fabric inside the stitch lines but don’t cut the water soluble stabilizer
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Place a layer of see through applique fabric over the area i.e. organza or organdy
• Sew the tack down stitches that attach the applique fabric to the main fabric
• Remove the hoop from the machine but do not remove the fabric from the hoop.
• Cut away the excess applique fabric from outside the stitches
• Return the hoop to the machine
• Sew any details on top of the applique fabric followed by the the finishing stitches that cover the raw edges of the applique and the opening at the same time.
• Wash out the water soluble stabilizer.

Hardanger – includes a cutwork concept I’ll cover in a page all it’s own.

Cutwork

Beginnings Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Cutwork

Diamonds Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Heart Cutwork - Heirloom Insertion Lace

Nancy's Jacobean Cutwork

Prisms Amour

Hardanger Machine Embroidery

Hardangish

Hardanger Alphabet

Hardanger Angels - Bella

Hardanger Angels - Heather

Hardanger Angels - Mary Jane

Hardanger Dimensions

Hardanger Eggs

Hardanger Floral Angels

Hardanger Floral Hearts

Hardanger On-Point

Hardanger Ornaments

Hardanger Rainbows

Hardanger Squared

Hardanger Stockings

Hardanger Wreaths

Florals

Floral embroidery is an ancient obsession. I think you will agree when I say that obsession still lives today.  My machine embroidery floral designs range from simple to complex, from small to extra large. There is something for everyone.

They are a mainstain among machine embroidery. Everyone loves flowers and can never get enough of them. I’m one of those people. What’s more, florals are so versatile you will find them in many categories and variations.

  • Quilt Designs – indoor and outdoor
  • Quilting Designs aka “Quiltering” designs
  • Fringe Designs
  • Cutwork Designs
  • Trapunto Designs
  • Hardanger Designs

And the list goes on…

When it comes to florals the sky’s the limit…

Simple Kaleidoscope Petals…

Large arrangements of flower favorites…

Summer's Gold Collection
Summer’s Gold Collection

Florals audacious in their details…

Fantastic Tulips Collection
Fantastic Tulips with Fringe

 

Applique Elegance Collection
Applique Elegance Collection

I talk about Applique, Hardanger, Fringe, Quilts, Quiltering and Cutwork designs on another page.

Take a gander and check it out!

 

Florals

Applique Elegance

Fantastic Tulips

Fantasy Applique

Pots O' Flowers

Prisms Amour

Simple Flowers

Tulips Applique

Fimbria Flowers

Love Is...

Love One Another

Flowers, flowers and more flowers...



...I may have gotten carried away, a bit.

Berries

Carnations

Delicate Florals

Filigree Flowers

Floral Embellishments

Floral Embellishments 2

Floral Fountains

Floral Parade

Flowers A Plenty

Kaleidoscope Petals

Love My Bloomers

Monogram Potpourri 4x4

Monogram Potpourri 5x7

Monogram Potpourri 6x10

Petal Party

Pinwheel Petals

Purple Fancies

Spring Bouquet

Summer's Gold

Sunflower Harvest

But wait! There's more...

Ear Warmers

Christmas Quilt Banner

Our Whole Life Quilt Banner Series

Spring Quilt Banner

Summer Quilt Banner

Welcome Fall Quilt Banner

Grandmother's Flower Garden

Hawaiian Juiced

Pansy Wreath

Rose of Sharon

Spring Garden

Summer's Gold Quiltering

Trapunto Flowers

Almost forgot!

Births - Heralding Project

Two Hearts, One Love

Wing Needle Lily

Did I forget anything?