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Go Strum It!

~~ Links to purchase ‘Go Strum It’ is at the bottom of this page ~~

I purchased this artwork last year for my great nephew and to make my niece a wall quilt to hang in her cubicle at work. She is in a position where she trains people who have no experience in this job. So you know she is challenged everyday. Plus both her husband and son are accomplished guitarist. So it all fits!

Her son Will and his wife like the basic colors gray, black, and white as do many young people these days.

This one is for Will!

Continue reading Go Strum It!

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Are you stable enough for machine embroidery?

Are you stable enough for machine embroidery?

Are you stable enough for machine embroidery? That’s the question my hubby put to me recently and while we weren’t necessarily talking about machine embroidery or even fabric art, in general, before I could think of a good comeback he quipped, “Don’t be too hasty in answering, ’cause you may be mistaken.”

We dined separately that night. He supped in utter solitude, choking down a three-cheese & mushroom omelet, atop a bed of fresh spinach leaves, with slices of avocado and tomato topped with hollandaise sauce, and a nice glass of Merlot, while I heartily enjoyed a PBJ, of my own creation, and a glass of milk, which I ended up “sharing” with my cat, when I turned my back for one lousy second. Anyway, that’ll teach him!

Still, his impertinent question stuck in my head like that peanut butter did the roof of my mouth, for after conversing with some of you out there I gotta ask, “Are you stable enough for machine embroidery?” I know. I get it. It shows through the front side. It’s too bulky. It’s too scratchy. It’s too stiff. It’s too much for my tu-tu. I’ve heard it all. I’ve said it all at one time or another. You may have even quoted me…or I you… when it comes to stabilizers. You’re welcome…and thank you.

But here’s the ugly truth: It’s almost impossible to be too stable for machine embroidery. Still, can you do it and still be stylish. I’d bet my hubby’s pink, plaid polyester short-sleeve shirt on it…unless you’d like to just take it off my hands, ’cause for thirty years I’ve not been able to get rid of it. It always finds its way home. Anyway, you’ve just gotta know a few tricks…to remain stable, that is.

If any of you have started out to sew my stuff – be it one of my free embroidery designs or something you purchased – with the motto, “I don’t need no stinkin’ stabilizer!”, then you, my friend, may have been mistaken…maybe…just possibly. Yes, I know who you are. I’ve read your emails and comments, which is why I’m writing you now to let you know that you too can be stable enough for machine embroidery, with no one being the wiser.

He is risen! Easter Banner
My Easter Banner project has all 3 stabilizers. It’s smooth like it should be.

There’s a lot of stabilizers out there, with each serving it’s own unique purpose. I wish I could tell you to go buy a bolt of such-n-such, perch it upon your stash for ready access, and you and your embroidery would be rock-solid stable. Sadly, that’s just not how it works, ’cause it seems for every which way there is, someone’s invented a stabilizer for sewing. Go figure. Now, it may be possible to have a competition to see who dies with the most stabilizer, but I don’t think it would be a particularly interesting race or nearly as much fun as one involving fabric. As such, I’ll throw out a few for you.

Too Lazy Pile of of Shame
Too Lazy Pile of of Shame – No ShirTailor. UGH!

If there’s stabilizer that’s saved my bacon more times than I can remember – and made me look good in the process – it’s ShirTailor. It won’t solve all your stability issues – sewing or otherwise – but it’s a good stabilizer to keep on hand for machine embroidery projects.

I first encountered ShirTailor years ago when I finally relented to my hubby’s request for some hand-tailored dress shirts. The stuff does a beautiful job of keeping the shape of cuffs and collars. I found the more stable ShirTailor makes a better project. Sadly, he reneged on his promise to part with his beloved pink, plaid polyester short-sleeve shirt and I vowed not to stitch another cuff or collar while that thing lived. At least he keeps it hidden from sight in the dark recesses of his closet, like the little troll that it is. He keeps threatening that it will be in style again, one day. Yeah, right.

Our Whole Life Banner Series - Grandchildren
Our Whole Life Banner Series – Grandchildren

I’m partial to the fusible ShirTailor, because once I’ve ironed it to the back of my fabric I can be half asleep at the embroidery machine and I’m pretty much golden, so long as I start with a new needle and a bit more as you’ll read below. I’ve tried going ShirTailor-less on occasion only to discover I’d sacrificed my precious fabric, threads and time to another article on the “too lazy pile of shame”. See that picture up there?

While it’s possible to steam and iron out most of the puckering from my lapse of judgment, I know from that point on the project will always be one of my “unruly children” in need of perpetual supervision, lest it embarrass me publicly, for which it may one day rue the day. It’s simply true what they say, You’ve got to get ’em ironed out and stable early on if you ever want to take ’em out in public. Regrettably, it’s a lesson I learned too late with my hubby. Fortunately for him, I have bad taste in men – no wait, that’s not true!

Sadly, you can’t get all this kind of wonderful without a little more help. You know what I mean? In the case of these banner projects two additional “stabilizers” were the extra oomph I needed to get the their winner’s circle finish.

After the ShirTailor got fused to the back of the fabric, I followed up with a layer of Quilter’s Dream 80/20 Fusible batting. Techinically, QD is not a stabilizer and actually contributes to the push & pull of the fabric within the hoop. However, because QD adds loft to those parts of the fabric that aren’t otherwise stitched down, it gives the finished project a taunt, smooth look, just like that face lift you promised yourself on your fiftieth.

Of course, if your thing is embroidering clothes, unless you’re embellishing a lined jacket or hat, quilt batting isn’t going to be part of your project. On the other hand, if you’re embellishing pillows, shams, quilts and wall hanging, you want to consider adding Quilter’s Dream Fusible batting to your arsenal.

Finally, because three seems to be a magical number, the third stabilizer I typically use is a layer of soft tear-away on the bottom under the Quilter’s Dream or, if you’re making a wearable project, then under the ShirTailor. Once the project is secured in the hoop, the tear-away stabilizer minimizes the push & pull of the fabric and any batting you might use. Of course, once your project is sewn, you removed the tear-away from around the design and all you’re left with is ShirTailor and batting or just ShirTailor. It’s not necessary to remove all the tiny areas of tear away because it is not going to show through the front anyway.

Our Whole Life Banner Series – All 3 stabilizers and it’s perfectly smooth

The point of this exercise is to demonstrate that you don’t get to this level of beautiful without adding a few extra layers to the base. Sorry ladies but we all know it’s true. Same goes for machine embroidery.

I think perhaps I’ve said enough. At least for today, as we’ve all got more important things to do. Cooking? Heavens no! That’s what TV dinners are for. Still, I’ll leave you with one thought. Before you embark on that next great project or you simply want to road test some of those free embroidery designs you’ve been adding to your stash, do yourself a favor and test your stabilizers. If not my approach, then experiment with your own. Don’t just go blithefully into the night singing, “I don’t need no stinkin’ stabilizer.” We all need a little stablizer(-ing) now and then.

Everyone can use a bit of stabilizer(-ing) now and then.
Everyone can use a bit of stabilizer(-ing) now and then.

P.S. Check back soon for my next new embroidery design release.

Written by Albert W. Waterfield (because my writing skills are not nearly as creative as his)
Edited by Laura M. Waterfield




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Frilly Doodles No. 8C – Free Embroidery Design, to the first 500

Frilly Doodles No. 8C - Free Embroidery Design

Frilly Doodles No. 8C - Free Embroidery Design
Frilly Doodles No. 8C – Free Embroidery Design

In appreciation for those of you who support me and my studio, here is another in a series of free embroidery designs.

This design replaces the one offered before in its series and will subsequently be replaced by another in a week or so.  If you’re enamored with these freebies so much that you want to share with your fellow threadnuts – um, fabric artist –  please send your fellow enthusiast here so that they can check out the rest of my embroidery library, tutorials and inspirational stories and photographs.

If you like these freebies and want to make sure you get the rest of the collection, moving forward, consider signing up for my newsletter or Facebook group. Otherwise, come visit often and stay as long as you like.

Should you be inspired to craft something with these designs, please consider sharing photographs of your projects, as I’d love to see them.

YES! I WANT FRILLY DOODLES NO. 8c

 



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The Cottage Shoppes

Cottage Shoppe 8x11 Applique Machine Embroidery Project

Cottage Shoppe Applique Machine Embroidery Project
Cottage Shoppe 8×11

~~~~ Links to each collection are at the bottom of this page ~~~~

I ran across this free artwork a few years ago. I didn’t know if it would be well received or not. So I have hung onto it. This is actually the first cottage I made. There is so many details, hence all the thread changes. But it is worth it!

The one sewn on blue is sewn onto polar fleece and the house is cream polar fleece.

Cottage Shoppe 8×11

The one sewn on gray is sewn onto gray wool and the cottage is cream polar fleece

Cottage Shoppe 8×11

The pink and blue cottages are cotton and sewn on cotton.

Cottage Shoppe 5×7

 

Cottage Shoppe 6×9

They fit the 5×7, 6×9, 7×11, and 8×11 hoops or larger

On the product pages be sure to zoom into the photos to see all the details.

All cottages were hooped with a layer of cotton quilting fleece on the backside, plus one layer of medium weight soft tear away stabilizer. The cottage on the blue polar fleece was sewn with a top layer of Badgemaster. It’s not shown in the picture because I washed it out.

Notions

  • Background fabric of choice
  • Applique fabric for: The stone chimney and steps; the house and dormers; the roof; the grass up against the front of the house; and the sign. Take note that the stitching will show up better on solid or almost solid fabrics.
  • Cotton quilt batting
  • Medium weight soft tear away stabilizer
  • Topdressing of Badgemaster – if sewing onto fleece or any knit fabric
  • Size 12 Topstitch needle for fabrics other than knits
  • Size 11 Ball point needle if sewing onto knit fabric
  • Size 80 or 100 weight bobbin thread – I use Wonderfil polyester bobbin threads
  • Thread colors of choice.

Thread Colors Needed

  1. Color to match each of the applique fabrics
  2. Color a shade or two darker than what matches each of the applique fabrics. These will sew the heavy blanket stitch around the applique, a few line details, and the shingles on the roof
  3. Three greens – dark, medium, light
  4. Light gold for flower centers and petals
  5. Gold for door knob
  6. Pale yellow or lighter for the light inside the house. Can also use pale blue or pale blue/gray
  7. Dark gray or black for the wrought iron sign holder and the sewing machine (if you chose to sew that particular sign)
  8. Color for the curtains and a coordinating color for the stripes (For coordinating color I used white most of the time and pink once)
  9. Three pinks for the tree flowers: light, medium, and dark pinks or colors of choice
  10. Color for the cone flowers (I used soft gold)
  11. Color for the center of the cone flowers (I used brown)
  12. Color for the daisies (I used blue or white with yellow centers)
  13. Two colors for the flowers outside the dormers – I used medium pink and rose red. I used the same two colors for the flowers inside the front window as well as the lamp shade, bowl, and vase inside the front window.
  14. Color for the window frames and the door – I used dark red or white
  15. Color for the decorative wood trim around and above the door – I used white
  16. Brown for the topiary trunk and lamp base inside the front window.
  17. Two colors for the topiary planter – I used rose and white or blue and white
  18. The topiary top colors sew with various flower colors during the design
  19. Two coordinating colors for the rose buds just outside the door – I used 2 shades of pink or 2 shades of plum.

The sign

There are two signs: ‘Welcome’ and ‘Sewing Machine’.

Both signs are included in the design. They sew after everything else is sewn.

Cottage Shoppe 8×11 Inches

Cottage Shoppe 7×11 Inches

Cottage Shoppe 6×9 Inches

Cottage Shoppe 5×7 Inches

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”
― Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from the Birmingham Jail